• Heather Cardle

#FrameItFriday (week 47 season 2)


#FrameItFriday (week 47, season 2)

I can't believe how quick this week went now that it's Friday....not sure if I felt the same this past Tuesday but whatever.

I've pretty much finished up the barrage of bird shots but I can't promise you that there won't be a few more albums posted.

This past week or so I've seen posts and photos of Snowy Owl sightings around the southern Ontario area. They seem legit as they've photographic proof. I was Snowy seeking a few years back and took lots of photos of plastic bags out in fields (until I got home, zoomed in on the shots and realized I'd been tricked by an actual owl lol).

So, I thought I'd just tell you a few facts about the snowy's that I've taken off the web (hope they're all true lol) Males are pretty much all white feathers, females have specks of black in their feathers. They swallow their prey whole, geesh...imagine stuffing a whole hamburger in your mouth and going "gulp". Gross. When it's time to make the babies they prefer to be in Alaska, northern Manitoba, northern Quebec. Snowy's are diurnal (I had to look it up) it means they hunt for food night and day, much like teenage boys. They don't swim but they do bathe. They don't eat fish unless they have no choice (much like myself unless it's fish and chips then heck ya, wait...we're talking about the owl, not me). I won't even mention how it "prepares it's meal". Obviously they keep warm with all those feathers, hunkering down behind a rock or something to block the wind, much like what I do. Only difference between it and me is that I'd actually come inside if it's cold out. The owl is welcome to join me but that's highly unlikely. People say that the owl is a symbol of wisdom, patience, and is magical and mysterious. I think it's cool that seeing an owl may also represent a spirit guide.

Tis the season for seeing them in our neck of the woods. Most likely perched on fenceposts overlooking vast fields. Don't feed them, bait them or whatever to come closer. It not only makes them lazy to hunt (are you going to follow them back up north and feed them too) you'll also be endangering their lives by bringing them closer to the roads.

This is just a very basic write up on what I found on the web. I'm no National Geographic writer but I do love the creature and I want to keep seeing it out in it's natural environment so keep your distance and watch in wonder. The photo I've posted was taken at the Canadian Raptor Conservancy and the owl shown lives there permanently, he expects to get a treat every time he flies and he gets it. The ones in the wild fend for themselves and do quite well.

Today I get to shoot Sesame Street Live....I hope they don't sing that baby shark song I've heard tortures your eardrums. It will be fun to see all the littles at the theatre enjoying the show.

Peace, love and kumbaya Heather

#SnowyOwls #BirdofPrey #Raptor #ShotOnCanon #CanonGirl#CanadianRaptorConservancy #HeatherCardlePhotographer#PhotoBlog

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Heather Cardle Photographer
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